South Korea’s Park Chan-wook wins best director award at Cannes for his  movie “Decision To Leave”- MPMandiBoard

South Korea’s Park Chan-wook wins best director award at Cannes for his  movie “Decision To Leave”- MPMandiBoard

By AFP

CANNES, France – South Korean star director Park Chan-wook received the best director award at the Cannes Picture Festival on Saturday for his sexy crime film “Decision To Leave.”

“Decision To Leave,” starring Chinese actress Tang Wei and Korean actor Park Hae-il, tells the story of a detective who, while investigating a man’s deadly fall from a mountain, falls under the spell of the victim’s widow, whom he accuses of being the one who killed her husband.

The detective plot becomes increasingly entwined with the main protagonists’ mutual affection and the resulting erotic tension, which is heightened by the persistent threat of death.

When the film opened at the festival, Park told AFP, “I’m not a romantic, but I’m very interested in the portrayal of emotions.”

Cannes audiences reacted positively to “Decision To Leave.” The BBC termed it a “cracking romantic thriller,” and Screen noted that “Park can construct a truly enjoyable and potentially commercial thriller even without the dramatic shock methods of some of his previous work.”

The Adagietto from Gustav Mahler’s 5th Symphony, immortalised in Luchino Visconti’s 1971 film “Death In Venice,” is featured on the film’s mesmerising soundtrack.

Park, 58, said, “I attempted to locate other classical pieces that may work, but this one by Mahler was just wonderful.” “I wondered if there was a rule that only Visconti could use this piece.

No, there isn’t, so I went ahead and did it anyhow.”

Park’s Cannes submission comes nearly two decades after his 2004 film “Oldboy,” which won the festival’s second-highest prize and helped launch South Korean cinema onto the global stage — and years before “Parasite,” which won the 2019 Palme d’Or and will be nominated for best film at the 2020 Oscars.

The picture, according to Park, was inspired by the systematic police work found in the Swedish “Martin Beck” crime thriller literature. “That’s what I wanted to portray in a film,” he explained.